Internship Credit

Policy for Internship Approval

Internships are a valuable tool to enhance an academic portfolio. However, academic credit will not be awarded for experience alone; rather credit is awarded based on the academic component of the internship.

Credit for internships will be determined as follows:

Internships.  Internships are characterized by mentored learning opportunities achieved through the completion of assigned tasks. The student does not typically take a lead role in determining daily activities or long-term projects.   The vast majority of internships exist within this category.

a) Each completed internship is awarded one credit.
b) While the number of internships that can be completed is not limited, a maximum of  one  internship credit will be applied to the degree.
c) Internship credits cannot be applied to the student’s major.
d) Internships will be graded S/U.
e) Normally, internship evaluation criteria should include a pre-approval of the internship based upon a letter of support from a supervisor and a description of activities provided by the student, a daily diary of completed activities and reflections, a formal reflection paper at the conclusion of the internship, and a final letter of evaluation from the internship supervisor.
f) Approval and final evaluation of internships are charged to the student’s Assistant Dean in the case of non-departmental internships (e.g., AL 45999) or DUS in the case of departmentally-administered internships (e.g., FTT 35501). 

Major/Minor Internships (i.e. Internships within a major or minor) . Major/Minor internships involve clear and extraordinary intellectual and/or creative development. Such activities are characterized by the production of an independent creative work whose quality and success can be assessed by Notre Dame faculty. The student typically takes a lead role in determining daily activities and long-term projects.  Such internships are the clear exception, rather than the norm, in the context of the undergraduate experience.

a) Major/Minor internships may be awarded one, two, or three credits based upon the type and duration of the activity.
b) A maximum of three credits of Major/Minor internship credit will be applied to the degree. Departments who approve a Major/Minor internship  must  apply the associated credits to the student’s major/minor. That is, a Major/Minor internship must be judged to be of sufficient quality and duration to fulfill a major/minor course requirement.
c) Major/Minor internships will be assigned a letter grade.
d) Normally, evaluation criteria should be the same as those for regular internships, with the addition of a faculty evaluation of the final intellectual or creative project. Additional evaluation criteria may be established by individual academic departments, or programs.
e) Approval and final evaluation of Major/Minor internships are charged to the relevant Department Chair or Chair’s Designee (e.g., DUS) or Program Director who may consult with the relevant Assistant Dean.

To apply for an Arts and Letters internship, students must be enrolled in the College of Arts and Letters. Prior approval is necessary from the Office for Undergraduate Studies, 104 O’Shaughnessy Hall, to ensure proper credit transfer. To obtain credit for an internship the student must do the following:

• Write a 2-3 page goals and objectives statement, outlining the nature of the work that will be performed and listing at least three specific goals and objectives and what will be gained from the experience.  These objectives should be reevaluated in the final essay before credit is granted.
• Keep a daily journal of internship activities while working.
• Write a formal reflection paper that includes what insights were gained from this experience and the description of a significant project or the overall work experience. Also include an explanation of how it contributed to the company, industry or enterprise, as well as to the students personal development.
• Upon completion of the internship, please have the supervisor send a letter of evaluation to the Office for Undergraduate Studies, 104 O’Shaughnessy Hall, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556.

The paper and journal are due the last class day of the semester, if the internship is taken during the academic year, and during the first week of the fall semester, if the internship is taken during the summer session.

Registration for the Appropriate Course

If approval is granted, the student must obtain an override from the Office for Undergraduate Studies and register into AL 45999 01 or 45999 02 for the summer term in which the internship is taken.

For any questions about the awarding of credit for internships, the student should stop by the Office for Undergraduate Studies, 104 O’Shaughnessy Hall and speak to either Dean Ava Preacher, Dean Collin Meissner, Dean Nick Russo, Dean Joseph Stanfiel, or Dean Vicki Toumayan.

How to Find an Internship

The Career Center is a valuable resource for students researching internship opportunities. Ms. LoriAnn Edinborough Program Director, Global Internship Initiative manages databases such as the Internship Exchange and Go Irish which contain thousands of internships across the country. The Career Center is located in 248 Flanner Hall. Main office hours are M-F 8:00am-5:00pm. Walk-in hours are 1:00pm-4:30pm.

To schedule an appointment call (574)631-5200.

 

More Internship Info:


Office for
Undergraduate Studies

Location: 104 O’€™Shaughnessy Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556
Office Hours: 8 am-€“5 pm

Stop by or call for an appointment with your advising dean. Phone: 574-631-7098


Arts and Letters News

  • Historian Wins Phi Beta Kappa Award for Book on Philology

    Phi Beta Kappa

    For his book pulling together the complex history of philology and how Western humanistic learning split into the modern humanities that we know today, Notre Dame historian James Turner has received the Phi Beta Kappa Christian Gauss Award. The honor is given for books in literary scholarship or criticism and is named for a distinguished Princeton University scholar, teacher, and dean. Turner’s book, Philology: The Forgotten Origins of the Modern Humanities, looks at how learned researchers once included languages, history, and texts in a single broad field of study that came to be known as philology. Read More >

  • Liberal Studies Professor and Medieval Institute Faculty Affiliate Wins Olivia Remie Constable Prize

    Robichaud Icon

    Denis Robichaud, an assistant professor in the Program of Liberal Studies, has been awarded the 2016 Olivia Remie Constable Prize in Medieval Studies for study at the University of Oxford this summer. The prize was established last year by Robert M. Conway to honor Remie Constable, the former director of Notre Dame’s Medieval Institute, and was held last summer by Kent Emery Jr., a professor in the Program of Liberal Studies, who completed work for an ongoing multi-person Duns Scotus edition. Robichaud studies 15th-century history and philosophy, and particularly Marsilio Ficino. Read More >

  • Video: William Collins Donahue on the Resonance of Small Moments in Holocaust Literature

    William Collins Donahue

    “Early literary encounters with the Holocaust tended to tell you about the whole event, but now when the Holocaust appears, generally speaking, it appears in small moments, in kind of passing glances,” said William Collins Donahue, the John J. Cavanaugh, C.S.C., Professor of the Humanities and chair of the Department of German and Russian Languages and Literatures at the University of Notre Dame. Donahue has researched extensively in the areas of literary realism and modernism, especially the work of Elias Canetti. Now focusing primarily on Holocaust literature, Donahue is developing an analogy for how the Holocaust appears in contemporary narratives. These small episodes, Donahue said, are similar to the Stolpersteine, a worldwide movement of small pavement stones, each commemorating a victim in the Holocaust. Read More >

  • Video: Theology Professor Khaled Anatolios on Studying the Origins of Christian Doctrines

    Khaled Anatolios Icon

    “I tend to gravitate towards doctrines that seem inexplicable, and I try to understand what motivated the early Christians to formulate these doctrines in just these ways,” said Khaled Anatolios, professor of theology at the University of Notre Dame. Anatolios specializes in the theology of the early Church. As a Byzantine Catholic priest, he has a special interest in the doctrines of the Greek fathers as well as complementary ideas between the Eastern and Western traditions. His current research focuses on the doctrine of salvation, particularly the disconnect between classical sources and modern experience. Read More >