Saturday Scholar Series

A different game plan for autumn weekends

Fall 2015 Schedule

Saturday Scholars 2015

Come back to campus! You are invited to experience an intimate discussion with Notre Dame’s most engaging faculty speakers on some of the most pressing and fascinating issues of our times.

Each lecture and Q&A is presented in the Snite Museum’s Annenberg Auditorium at noon (unless otherwise noted) on a “home game” Saturday. All lectures are free and open to the public.

More information about other “home game” events on campus is available on the GameDay website.

9.5.15 (vs. University of Texas)

Game at 7:30 p.m.; lecture at 4 p.m.

“The Changing American Voter in 2016 and Beyond”

Luis Fraga, Arthur Foundation Endowed Professor of Transformative Latino Leadership; Professor, Department of Political Science; Co-Director, Institute for Latino Studies

9.19.15 (vs. Georgia Institute of Technology)

“Sparkle: Contemporary Girls’ Media Culture”

Mary Celeste Kearney, Associate Professor, Department of Film, Television, and Theatre; Director, Gender Studies Program

9.26.15 (vs. University of Massachusetts)

“What’s Posterity Ever Done for Us?: Literature and the Future”

John Sitter, Mary Lee Duda Professor of Literature, Department of English

10.10.15 (vs. U.S. Naval Academy)

“Father Theodore Hesburgh, C.S.C., Among the Notre Dame Presidents”

Notre Dame’s 17 presidents, from Father Edward Sorin to Father John I. Jenkins, have advanced what was initially a regional preparatory school into an internationally recognized Catholic university. This session will examine the legacy of Father Ted Hesburgh among Notre Dame’s presidents.

Father Thomas Blantz, C.S.C., Professor Emeritus, Department of History
Dr. Nancy Haegel, Materials Science Center Director, National Renewable Energy Laboratory
Father Edward A. “Monk” Malloy, C.S.C., President Emeritus

Timothy Matovina, Professor, Department of Theology; Co-Director, Institute for Latino Studies

10.17.15 (vs. University of Southern California)

Game at 7:30 p.m.; lecture at 4 p.m.

“How Our Siblings Shape Us: Evidence from Economics”

Are big families better for children? Is there an advantage to being the oldest? This discussion will explore the many ways that the number and composition of one’s siblings affect development and long-term well-being.

Kasey Buckles, Brian and Jeannelle Brady Associate Professor of Economics

11.14.15 (vs. Wake Forest University)

“1916: Screening the Irish Rebellion”

The 1916 Easter Rising in Dublin is not only a seminal historical event in Irish history but one which had reverberations around the globe, inspiring future freedom movements in places as far flung as India and Africa. The Rising itself was globalized from the start. Without the support of the Irish diaspora in the U.S., the Rising would never have happened. This talk will examine the complexities of these events and the experience of translating them into a documentary series for television.

Bríona Nic Dhiarmada, Thomas J. and Kathleen M. O’Donnell Professor of Irish Studies, Department of Irish Language and Literature; Concurrent Professor, Department of Film, Television, and Theatre.

Arts and Letters News

  • Arts and Letters Graduate Emmie Mediate Named Rhodes Scholar

    Emily Mediate

    Emmie Mediate, a 2015 graduate of Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters, has been selected to the American Rhodes Scholar Class of 2016. A native of Colorado Springs, Colorado, Mediate was one of 32 Rhodes Scholars selected from a pool of 869 candidates who had been nominated by their colleges and universities. She is Notre Dame’s 17th Rhodes Scholar and the University’s second in two years. Read More >

  • The Notre Dame Shakespeare Festival Announces its 2016 Season, Audition Dates

    Notre Dame Shakespeare Festival

    The Notre Dame Shakespeare Festival (NDSF) has announced the titles and audition dates for its upcoming 2016 summer season. In order to explore and celebrate Shakespeare’s final plays, NDSF has selected two works that embody the playwright’s voice at the close of his career. The 2016 season is named “Shakespeare’s Last Words” and will feature adventure, exhilaration, and redemption. Read More >

  • Marie Kissel ’83 on Study Abroad and the Liberal Arts as a Foundation for an International Career

    Marie Kissel

    Marie Kissel ’83 traces much of her success back to one key point in her Notre Dame experience: going overseas to Tokyo as an undergraduate. “I’ve got this great job, I’m in a region that’s very exciting—that would not have happened without my opportunities at Notre Dame, especially through the study abroad programs,” she said. Kissel is now vice president for government affairs for Asia at Abbott Laboratories, a global pharmaceuticals and health care products company. Read More >

  • Anthropologists’ Research Finds Emotionally Supportive Relationships Linked to Lower Testosterone


    Science and folklore alike have long suggested that high levels of testosterone can facilitate the sorts of attitudes and behavior that make for, well, a less than ideal male parent. It has long been known that among humans (and some other species as well), males who cooperate amicably with their female mates in raising and nurturing offspring often have lower testosterone levels than their more aggressive and occasionally grumpy counterparts. But two University of Notre Dame anthropologists are looking beyond the nuclear family for such effects. Read More >