David F. Ruccio

David Ruccio

Professor of Economics

410 Decio Hall
Notre Dame, IN 46556

574.631.6434
David.F.Ruccio.1@nd.edu

www.nd.edu/~druccio/
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B.A., Bowdoin College (1976)
Ph.D., University of Massachusetts-Amherst (1984)

Ruccio’s scholarly interests are in the areas of Marxian theory, economic methodology, development economics (especially in Latin America), and international political economy. His most recent books are Development and Globalization: A Marxian Class Analysis (Routledge), Economic Representations: Both Academic and Everyday (Routledge), Postmodern Moments in Modern Economics (Princeton University Press), Postmodernism, Economics, and Knowledge (Routledge), and Postmodern Materialism and the Future of Marxist Theory (Wesleyan University Press).

The author of more than 60 journal articles and book chapters, Ruccio is a member of the editorial board and past editor of Rethinking Marxism: A Journal of Economics, Culture, and Society. A frequent speaker in interdisciplinary programs and conferences around the world, he is currently working on “Economics, the University, and the World,” and “What’s the Matter with Exploitation.” He is a recipient of the Kaneb Teaching Award (2000), the AAUP Academic Freedom Award (2003), and the Rev. Edmund P. Joyce, C.S.C., Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching (2009).

Recent Research

Development and Globalization: A Marxian Class Analysis (New York: Routledge, 2010)

“Under the Dome: The Ethics and Politics of Reading Capital,” Rethinking Marxism 23 (January 2011)

“Postmodernism,” Handbook of Economics and Ethics, ed. Jane Peil and Irene van Staverern (Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar, 2009)

“Rethinking Gramsci: Class, Globalization, and Historical Bloc,” in Perspectives on Gramsci: Politics, Culture and Social Theory, ed. J. Francese (New York: Routledge, 2009)

“Economic Representations: What’s at Stake?” Cultural Studies 22 (November 2008)

Economic Representations: Both Academic and Everyday (New York: Routledge, 2008)

“(Un)real Criticism,” in Tony Lawson and His Critics, ed. E. Fullbrook (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2008)

“Socialism, Community, and Democracy: A Postmodern Marxian Vision of (Post-) Capitalism” (with A. Callari), for The Future of Heterodox Economics, ed. J. Harvey and R. Garnett (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2008)


Recent Honors/Awards

David Ruccio received a 2009 Rev Edmund P. Joyce, C.S.C. Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching

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