David F. Ruccio

David Ruccio

Professor of Economics

410 Decio Hall
Notre Dame, IN 46556


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B.A., Bowdoin College (1976)
Ph.D., University of Massachusetts-Amherst (1984)

Ruccio’s scholarly interests are in the areas of Marxian theory, economic methodology, development economics (especially in Latin America), and international political economy. His most recent books are Development and Globalization: A Marxian Class Analysis (Routledge), Economic Representations: Both Academic and Everyday (Routledge), Postmodern Moments in Modern Economics (Princeton University Press), Postmodernism, Economics, and Knowledge (Routledge), and Postmodern Materialism and the Future of Marxist Theory (Wesleyan University Press).

The author of more than 60 journal articles and book chapters, Ruccio is a member of the editorial board and past editor of Rethinking Marxism: A Journal of Economics, Culture, and Society. A frequent speaker in interdisciplinary programs and conferences around the world, he is currently working on “Economics, the University, and the World,” and “What’s the Matter with Exploitation.” He is a recipient of the Kaneb Teaching Award (2000), the AAUP Academic Freedom Award (2003), and the Rev. Edmund P. Joyce, C.S.C., Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching (2009).

Recent Research

Development and Globalization: A Marxian Class Analysis (New York: Routledge, 2010)

“Under the Dome: The Ethics and Politics of Reading Capital,” Rethinking Marxism 23 (January 2011)

“Postmodernism,” Handbook of Economics and Ethics, ed. Jane Peil and Irene van Staverern (Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar, 2009)

“Rethinking Gramsci: Class, Globalization, and Historical Bloc,” in Perspectives on Gramsci: Politics, Culture and Social Theory, ed. J. Francese (New York: Routledge, 2009)

“Economic Representations: What’s at Stake?” Cultural Studies 22 (November 2008)

Economic Representations: Both Academic and Everyday (New York: Routledge, 2008)

“(Un)real Criticism,” in Tony Lawson and His Critics, ed. E. Fullbrook (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2008)

“Socialism, Community, and Democracy: A Postmodern Marxian Vision of (Post-) Capitalism” (with A. Callari), for The Future of Heterodox Economics, ed. J. Harvey and R. Garnett (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2008)

Recent Honors/Awards

David Ruccio received a 2009 Rev Edmund P. Joyce, C.S.C. Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching

Arts and Letters News

  • Arts and Letters Graduate Emmie Mediate Named Rhodes Scholar

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    Emmie Mediate, a 2015 graduate of Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters, has been selected to the American Rhodes Scholar Class of 2016. A native of Colorado Springs, Colorado, Mediate was one of 32 Rhodes Scholars selected from a pool of 869 candidates who had been nominated by their colleges and universities. She is Notre Dame’s 17th Rhodes Scholar and the University’s second in two years. Read More >

  • The Notre Dame Shakespeare Festival Announces its 2016 Season, Audition Dates

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    The Notre Dame Shakespeare Festival (NDSF) has announced the titles and audition dates for its upcoming 2016 summer season. In order to explore and celebrate Shakespeare’s final plays, NDSF has selected two works that embody the playwright’s voice at the close of his career. The 2016 season is named “Shakespeare’s Last Words” and will feature adventure, exhilaration, and redemption. Read More >

  • Marie Kissel ’83 on Study Abroad and the Liberal Arts as a Foundation for an International Career

    Marie Kissel

    Marie Kissel ’83 traces much of her success back to one key point in her Notre Dame experience: going overseas to Tokyo as an undergraduate. “I’ve got this great job, I’m in a region that’s very exciting—that would not have happened without my opportunities at Notre Dame, especially through the study abroad programs,” she said. Kissel is now vice president for government affairs for Asia at Abbott Laboratories, a global pharmaceuticals and health care products company. Read More >

  • Anthropologists’ Research Finds Emotionally Supportive Relationships Linked to Lower Testosterone


    Science and folklore alike have long suggested that high levels of testosterone can facilitate the sorts of attitudes and behavior that make for, well, a less than ideal male parent. It has long been known that among humans (and some other species as well), males who cooperate amicably with their female mates in raising and nurturing offspring often have lower testosterone levels than their more aggressive and occasionally grumpy counterparts. But two University of Notre Dame anthropologists are looking beyond the nuclear family for such effects. Read More >